Triple Bottom Patterns

Triple bottom patterns are a bullish pattern. It consists of three valleys or support levels. After the first valley is formed, price goes up either quickly or gradually. After that, price moves back down to the first valley level and it holds that first support level, thus creating a double bottom. After that, price moves…

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Triple Top Patterns

Triple top patterns are a bearish pattern. It consists of three peaks or resistance levels. After the first peak level is formed, price goes down either quickly or gradually. After that, price moves back up to the first peak level and it fails that first resistance level, thus creating a double top. After the failure…

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Double Bottom Patterns

Double bottom patterns are a bullish pattern. It consists of two valleys or support levels. After the first support level is formed, price goes up either quickly or gradually. After that, price moves back down to the first support level and it holds that first support level, thus creating the double bottom. Look for price…

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Double Top Patterns

Double top patterns are a bearish pattern. It consists of two peaks or resistance levels. After the first peak level is formed, price pulls back either quickly or gradually. After that, price moves back up to the first level but it can’t break that first peak level and fails, thus creating the double top rejection….

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Inverted Cup and Handle Patterns

Inverted cup and handle patterns are the inverse of their counterpart the cup and handle. They are a bearish pattern. Picture the cup and handle upside down. The rounded bottom is up top and as price falls down to the base of the cup, it then gets a pop and retracement, which forms the handle….

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V Bottom Patterns

V bottom patterns are a bullish pattern that look like the name that they are called. Price moves up to a peak level and then starts to pull back or fall rapidly. Once price has found a base, it makes a sharp pointed reversal to the upside. Then, price goes back up to the 1st…

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Cup and Handle Patterns

Cup and handle patterns are a bullish pattern that look like the name that they are called. Price moves up to a peak level and then starts to pull back or fall rapidly. Once price has found a base, several candlesticks form the rounded cup bottom. Then, price goes back up to the 1st peak…

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Inverse Head and Shoulders Pattern

Inverse head and shoulders patterns are a bullish pattern. It’s made up of a head and two shoulders. The left shoulder marks the first support level. As price rises, it goes up to make a new high, then it pulls back and falls below first support level, thus creating the head. Next up, price pulls…

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Head and Shoulders Patterns

Head and shoulders patterns consist of several candlesticks that form a peak, which makes up the head, and two lower peaks that make up the left and right shoulders. The right shoulder on these patterns typically is lower than the left but many of times it’s equal. Sometimes there’s a fake out which makes right…

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Falling Wedge Patterns

Falling wedge patterns are bigger overall patterns that form a big bearish move to the downside. They form by connecting 2-3 points on both support and resistance levels. Price action forms a big down channel. It becomes bullish once price breaks out of the wedge. Look for a retest of the wedge after breakout and…

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